A Game Sense Style Pedagogy for Teaching Beach Wrestling

I have talked about how we prepared for the "King Of The Beach" competition on a podcast recently and what I noticed was what we did was very similar to how Andy from School of Grappling recommends that training be structured and also to the GameSense pedagogy I studied at Univerisity. It was excellent training as everyone had a purpose, it was enjoyable, and it was one of those rare moments in time at a practice where everyone was in the mix together. It makes you grateful for having positive training partners and getting to spend the time training together. Those kinds of moments that I can appreciate even more now that we cannot get on the mats. But one thing I did notice was that the level of everyone in the room did seem to progress substantially during that time and made me think about what we did. We trained for around 6-8 weeks doing two classes a week that followed this format. Generally, we did between five to ten rounds of each segment depending on how many people were in...

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The Plus, Minus and Equals training system of Frank Shamrock

Frank Shamrock was an early pioneer of mixed martial arts training with a unique approach to cross-training and fight strategy that enabled him to become the first UFC light heavyweight champion before vacating it after an all-time classic match against Tito Ortiz. He formed an alliance and cross-trained his shoot wrestling style with the kickboxing skills of Maurice Smith and the guard work of Tsuyoshi Kohsaka and successfully blended them together to form a well-rounded skill set. Each member of the alliance was able to help each other improve in a different area and in many ways exemplifies his plus, minus and equals training system which we will discuss in this article. Perhaps due to its inclusion in the book "Ego is the Enemy" by author Ryan Holiday one of the most notable aspects of Frank Shamrock's training is his system of plus, equals and minus. The plus, equals and minus formula is as simple as have a training partner that is better than you, at the same level and of...

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Guide to being a Cutman for MMA Athletes

Cutmen at an MMA fight are responsible for treating a fighters lacerations or swelling in the one-minute break between rounds. Therefore, a cutman's duties include getting the fighters to perform at their highest level of ability by minimising the effects of cuts and lacerations that could hinder their performance. Also, if cuts become too severe, it may lead to a fight being called off by a referee or doctor so in some situations a cutman's work could make the difference between winning and losing a contest.  All major MMA promotions will provide corners with their cutmen; a smaller show may provide one cutman per fight and rely on the chance of both fighters requiring a cutman from not occurring. However, at smaller regional shows a cutman may not be provided at all, and it will be expected that the coach or cornerman of a fighter will fill this role.  Learning the skills required to be a cutman can be through an informal apprenticeship where you could help out a more...

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Beginners Guide to Lucid Dreaming for Martial Arts

Dreams have been held with importance in numerous world cultures throughout history and often connected with aspects of a person's soul or ancestors. But western society will often dismiss them as irrelevant to your life experience and best ignored with the exception of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung who developed theories of interpreting dreams believing they were accessing the unconscious or subconscious mind. Interestingly many great western thinkers have been influenced by their dreams including Albert Einstein who had a dream that helped the creation of his Theory of Relativity and Rene Descartes who had a series of dreams that helped develop the scientific method. Many more examples of dream inspired creation exist that suggest the content of dreams are valuable and should not be so easily dismissed as nonsense. The following article will discuss the process Lucid dreaming which is when you become conscious within your dream and feel as if you are awake while...

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Four Principles of Martial Arts Skill Development

The core of talent in martial arts is not dependent on the presence of remarkable attributes but rather the absence of limitations imposed on yourself by society and your subconscious. Society and self-interference can hinder your mental, physical and emotional performance and the four principles which embody this lack of obstruction are non-resistance, accommodation, balance and the natural order. All humans are naturally born free of all obstructions, and it is only through external influences of society and our upbringing that we unconsciously develop these restrictions that stifle our development as martial artists. These four principles can all be witnessed in the natural world and explained in proverbs with which you might already be familiar. Trees that bend in the wind are examples of the principles of non-resistance, a gentle stream that can cut through stone is a case of the principle of accommodation, life thriving in moderate cycles is an example of the principle of...

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The origin of the phrase “As Happy as Larry” is from prizefighting.

The Australian colloquialism where your jovial mood is suggested to be "As happy as Larry." find its etymological roots in the early bare-knuckle pugilism of a Sydney prize fighter and undefeated middleweight boxing champion at the turn of the 19th century. The Larry in the idiom is Laurence 'Larry' Foley (1849-1917), who was born in Bathurst and would gain recognition as the "Father of Australian Boxing". He spent his formative years in Wollongong where he served a Roman Catholic priest and had an expectation of joining the priesthood but instead moved to Sydney where he would later participate in a Roman Catholic street fighting gang that feuded with a rival Protestant group. Larry Foley would become the unofficial bare-knuckle champion of Sydney by beating Sandy Ross the leader of the rival gang in a contest which lasted 71 rounds and went for over 2 hours and took place at Como in South Sydney. The bout which leads to the birth of the phrase "As Happy as Larry" was against the...

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The Bulldog Choke in MMA

In this video we're going to take a look at the Bulldog choke. It's a rare submission that was first used in the UFC back at UFC 31 when Carlos Newton submitted Pat Miletich. Historically the Bulldog choke has been favored by catch wrestlers because it forgoes the safety of securing solid back position and instead directly attacks the head for the submission. So instead of securing back hooks for a dominant position when going for the Bulldog choke you will attack the head and bring the body with you. The Bulldog choke essentially becomes a modified headlock or a headlock mixed with a rear naked choke. Now in Brazilian Jiu jitsu a headlock is seen as an amateur or beginner move as it actually gives up an easy pathway to the back for the person being attacked. But if you get your hand underneath the chin and are able to sit your feet and hips out in front of the head of your opponent it becomes very difficult to execute that escape quickly. Instead you can use your entire body weight...

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A Study of Pulling Guard in MMA for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Athletes

In this study, I look at pulling guard in MMA as an alternative way of getting the fight on to the ground. It's a rarely utilised strategy but has been successful for a small set of fighters who have excellent guards and have made it their speciality. The guard is technically an inferior position in fighting as you are on your back and trapped between the mat and the weight of your opponent on top of you while they can use the assistance of gravity to implement control and throw strikes. However the UFC was built on Royce Gracie's success from the guard and the impressive look of a small man submitting larger opponents off his back and Brazilian jiu-jitsu as a whole as built a reputation around taking this inferior position and with practice study and techniques turning into a spot where they have a competitive advantage and can finish fights. So in competition Brazilian jiu-jitsu players will often favour this position on their opponents to the point where double guard pulls where...

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Judo in MMA – A study of throws from fights of Karo Parisyan

Karo "The Heat" Parisyan is an Armenian born mixed martial artist who moved to America at the age of six and began training judo at the age of nine and was competing in freestyle fighting against fully grown adults when he was only fourteen years of age. He was trained by the legendary Gokor Chivichyan and "Judo" Gene LeBell at the Hayastan academy where he also learned the Hayastan grappling system. He was a ferocious competitor and became a ten time Junior national judo champion a four-time International judo champion and had faced the likes of Sean Sherk Antonio McKee and Jason "Mayhem" Miller in MMA and was focusing on the 2004 Olympic Judo trials before he got the call-up from the UFC. In this study we will list the Judo techniques that Karo utilized during his MMA career. Ippon Seoi Nage We will start with the Ippon Seoi Nage, the one-armed shoulder throw technique where both hands are used on one arm of the opponents as they are loaded onto the back lifted and thrown over the...

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The Suloev Stretch Submission Breakdown

In this analysis, I'm going to give a quick breakdown of the Suloev stretch submission. A hamstring submission executed from the back mount as your opponent tripods to escape. The Suloev stretch is a name coined by writer KJ Gould after the Armenian MMA fighter Amar Suloev who you can see using it here to submit Paul Cahoon. Amar previously fought in the UFC against Chuck Liddell and Phil Baroni. Suloev Stretch in Folkstyle Wrestling The move is very reminiscent of the banana split submission which has been used to get a tap in MMA, but the banana splits is executed from only one hook in and from a cross-body ride where you will reach across and grab the far leg of the opponent. It is also used in folkstyle wrestling matches where both boots are thrown in and as the opponent stands and tripods the leg is grabbed and used to off-balance the opponent knocking them over and securing back points. Suloev Stretch in MMA And there are some additional examples of its use in MMA when you have...

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